Tuesday, September 28, 2010 5:25 AM

Writing in Biblical Times

Tuesday, September 28, 2010 5:25 AM
Tuesday, September 28, 2010 5:25 AM

Bible critics have in the past and some cases even today state that Moses could not have written the first five books of the Bible, because writing had not been invented. In fact, the liberal Biblical scholars in the 19th and 20th centuries used this to undermind the accuracy of the Bible. Those liberal scholars are now dead and the Bible and God's word is still alive, but how many did they hurt along the way? They are still quoted to this day and their writings live on in liberal seminaries.

D. J. Wiseman notes, “By the time of Moses eight different languages were recorded in five different writing systems.”

The ancient Hebrews would have utilized the writing materials of their time. Thus we have references to writing on wood (Num 17:2–3; Ezek 37:16–17) and on either metal or wooden tablets that probably were covered with wax (Is 30:8; Hab 2:2). Later materials would have included papyrus (Jer 32:10–14; 36:21–23) and leather. Most of the Dead Sea Scrolls that were discovered at Qumran were written on leather. By the time of the New Testament, papyrus and parchment had become the most widely used materials. These eventually were replaced by paper, which came into prominence around the twelfth to thirteenth centuries a.d.[1]

Patzia, A. G. (1995). The making of the New Testament : Origin, collection, text & canon (112–113). Downers Grove, Ill.: InterVarsity Press.

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