Wednesday, June 12, 2013 4:33 AM

Upholding God's Holiness

Wednesday, June 12, 2013 4:33 AM
Wednesday, June 12, 2013 4:33 AM

Num20:12. And the Lord spoke unto Moses and Aaron, Because ye believed me not, to sanctify me in the eyes of the children of Israel, therefore ye shall not bring this congregation into the land which I have given them.[1]

How distressing it was to them, we may judge from the prayer of Moses, who sought to have the sentence reversed: “O Lord God, I pray thee let me go over and see the good land!” But, as Moses himself tells us, “God was wroth with him, and would not hear him.” How loudly does this speak to us! If we reflect on the length of time that they had served the Lord; the exemplary manner in which they had conducted themselves; (oftentimes at the peril of their lives striving with the people, and seeking to avert the wrath of God from them;) and that this, as it respected Moses at least, was almost the only fault that he had committed: if we at the same time consider, how grievous the disappointment must have been to them to have all their hopes and expectations frustrated, now that they had nearly completed the destined period of their wanderings; truly we cannot but see in this dispensation the evil and bitterness of sin; and feel the importance of that admonition.[2]

This portion of commentary is on the section of the Bible in which for the second time Moses is instructed by God to provide water for the people in the dessert by way of a rock. The first time God instructed Moses to strike the rock, but this second time Moses is instructed to speak to the rock. When Moses struck the rock in his anger, God’s wrath was incurred. God tells Moses and Aaron that they failed to uphold, or support His holiness by striking the rock. There is more to this sin than we can imagine because they incurred such a grievous punishment. Moses was called by God in the Bible the most humble man on earth. No one except maybe Adam spoke more often with God than Moses and yet “God was wroth with him, and would not hear him.”

The Bible also says that what is written in the Old Testament is for our example. This example has to teach that no matter what we think we have done or accomplished in our Christian life being faithful is the most important thing we can and must continue to do. Can any of us say that we have done more than Moses? Can any of us say that we have served more faithfully at the altar than Aaron? Have any of us worked harder or talked with God face to face more often than Moses and Aaron? Could God have given us a more powerful example of supporting and upholding His holiness in everything? For me this is one of the most humbling stories in the Bible.



[1] Simeon, C. (1832-63). Horae Homileticae Vol. 2: Numbers to Joshua (108). London.

[2] Simeon, C. (1832-63). Horae Homileticae Vol. 2: Numbers to Joshua (111–112). London.

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