Thursday, February 2, 2012 5:42 AM

Two Temples

Thursday, February 2, 2012 5:42 AM
Thursday, February 2, 2012 5:42 AM

I knew of the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem in A.D.70, but I did not know of the Capitoline Temple much less its destruction in A.D.69. The Capitoline Temple was sacred to the Capitoline Triad consisting of Jupiter and his companion deities, Juno and Minerva. Both battles involved the general Vespasian and both destroyed a temple of the Jewish faith and the other a temple for pagan worship. God was certainly clearing the way for the Church.

“This remarkable coincidence should not be overlooked. On December l9th, A.D. 69, the Capitoline Temple was burnt down in the war between Vitellius and Vespasian, which Tacitus calls the saddest and most shameful blow, and a sign of the anger of the gods. On August 10, A.D. 70, a Roman soldier flung a brand within the Temple of Jerusalem. “Thus,” says Döllinger, “within a few months the national sanctuary of Rome and the Temple of God, the two most important places of worship in the old world, owed their destruction to Roman soldiers—thoughtless instruments of the decrees and judgment of a higher power. Ground was to be cleared for the worship of God in spirit and in truth.”[1]


[1] Farrar, F. W. (1879-80). Vol. 1: The Life and Work of St. Paul. (603–604). London; New York [etc.: Cassell, Petter, Galpin & co.

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