Friday, February 10, 2012 5:23 AM

The Coming of the Lord

Friday, February 10, 2012 5:23 AM
Friday, February 10, 2012 5:23 AM

The Apostle Paul taught that the coming of the Lord was at hand and that all believers should be ready and waiting. He also taught that certain things must happen first and it was probably not immediate. Paul also knew that no one knew the day and after his first letter to the Thessalonians that caused confusion, he again wrote to clear up the misunderstanding. Move your cursor about these verses and follow the teaching of the coming of the Lord.

Allusions to a near Advent, 1 Thess. 1:9, 10, “ye turned to God. … to wait for His Son from heaven;” 1 Cor. 1:7, “To wait for the coming of the Lord Jesus” (cf. 2 Thess. 3:5); 1 Cor. 15:51, “We shall not all sleep, but we shall all be changed” (cf. 1 Thess. 4:15–17); James 5:8, 9, “The coming of the Lord draweth nigh. … The judge standeth before the door;” 1 Pet. 4:7, “The end of all things is at hand;” 1 John. 2:18, “Even now are there many antichrists, whereby we know that it is the last time;” Rev. 22:20, “Surely I come quickly.” On the sayings of our Lord, on which the expectation was perhaps founded (Matt. 24:29, 30, 34), see my Life of Christ, ii. 257 sq. On the other hand, if St. Paul contemplated the possibility of being alive at the Day of the Lord, he also was aware that though near, it would not be immediate (2 Cor. 4:14; 2 Thess. 2.; Rom. 11:24–27), and at a later period looked forward to his own death (Phil. 1:20–23).[1]



[1] Farrar, F. W. (1879-80). The Life and Work of St. Paul. London; New York [etc.: Cassell, Petter, Galpin & co.

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