Saturday, May 24, 2014 4:16 AM

It's Just That Simple

Saturday, May 24, 2014 4:16 AM
Saturday, May 24, 2014 4:16 AM

Trying to imitate the early church of Paul’s day is something that I hear all the time…as if the churches Paul founded had no problems. A reading of Paul’s letters will certainly dispel that thought. There is this claim by each church that they have some claim on doing church more accurately than another. Here is a quote that reflects well on this idea.

One reason that we tend to commit the fallacy of idealism when we reflect on the early church is that we have assumed that “the determining factors of the historical process are (what is most important).” Such a false premise too often leads to the false conclusion that if we get our ideas about the faith right or if we emulate “the pattern” of the early church, then our Christian community will be what it ought to be.[1]

But if we read Paul’s letters carefully, they reveal that right living and proper social interaction both within the Christian community and with the larger world were at least as much of a concern as right thinking, and evidently the early Christians had difficulties with all these matters. [2]

What worship ought to be is not process; it is much simpler than we try to make it. Here is what an Angel commanded in the Book of Revelation: Rev14.7 And he said with a loud voice, “Fear God and give him glory, because the hour of his judgment has come, and worship him who made heaven and earth, the sea and the springs of water.”  It’s just that simple; fear God (which is to hate sin), and worship Him as the creator of all things.

Here is how it will be in eternity:

Rev22.3 No longer will there be anything accursed, but the throne of God and of the Lamb will be in it, and his servants will worship him. They will see his face, and his name will be on their foreheads. And night will be no more. They will need no light of lamp or sun, for the Lord God will be their light, and they will reign forever and ever. We will worship God and there will be no sin.

Right living and right social interaction is a result; just as peace and joy are a result, and they each come from a heart that worship’s God without placing process first…It’s just that simple.


[1] Witherington III, B. (1995). Conflict and Community in Corinth : A Socio-Rhetorical Commentary on 1 and 2 Corinthians (xv). Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co.

[2] Witherington III, B. (1995). Conflict and Community in Corinth : A Socio-Rhetorical Commentary on 1 and 2 Corinthians (xv). Grand Rapids, MI: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Co.

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