Wednesday, March 26, 2014 4:49 AM

In Our Hearts

Wednesday, March 26, 2014 4:49 AM
Wednesday, March 26, 2014 4:49 AM

God knew that not all men would have access to the truths of Scripture at all times, so He inscribed a law upon their hearts. Paul wrote, “When Gentiles who have not the law do by nature what the law requires, they are a law to themselves, even though they do not have the [written] law. They show that what the law requires is written on their hearts, while their conscience also bears witness …” (Rom. 2:14–15). Some Christian thinkers have described this knowledge of the law as “innate” or as “a natural inclination.”1 Even some non-Christians admit to the universality of ethical principles.

The great moral creeds of mankind’s civilizations have given testimony to the general revelation of God in the striking resemblance of their basic ethical principles. C. S. Lewis has assembled many of these creeds in the excellent appendix to his book. The Abolition of Man2 Further evidence of the universal availability of God’s “natural revelation” comes to light when one asks the following questions: What person does not expect to be treated as a person? Who ever actually believed that it was right to take what belonged to anyone at any time? Who ever truly believed that murder, rape, or cruelty to children was morally right?

1 Thomas Aquinas. Summa Theologica 1.103.8.

2 C. S. Lewis, The Abolition of Man (New York: Macmillan, 1947), pp. 95–121.

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