Sunday, November 30, 2014 4:36 AM

God Knows that You Know

Sunday, November 30, 2014 4:36 AM
Sunday, November 30, 2014 4:36 AM

These verses in Romans tell us clearly that God knows there are no atheists.

Ro 1:18 For the wrath of God is revealed from heaven against all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men, who by their unrighteousness suppress the truth. Ro 1:19 For what can be known about God is plain to them, because God has shown it to them. Ro 1:20 For his invisible attributes, namely, his eternal power and divine nature, have been clearly perceived, ever since the creation of the world, in the things that have been made. So they are without excuse.

The dialogue between God and Job is nothing more than God telling Job I know that you know, and you know that I know that you know

God is not quizzing Job, not trying to squelch him by stumping him with hard questions. God overwhelms Job by showing him the obvious, by opening his eyes to what he already knows. If the theophany had been a revelation of something new or hidden, the book would not be so relevant for people who do not receive such a revelation. On the other hand, if God had merely tried to shut Job up by demonstrating Job’s ignorance, he would be saying that there was no possible way for Job to see God’s equity and orderly rule and thus would in effect be excusing him for speaking of God as arbitrary and immoral. Rather, God is saying to Job, You know very well that I and I alone created order and maintain it in the world, and I know that you know, and you know that I know that you know. This is the meaning of God’s opening challenge: “Who is this that obscures providence by ignorant words?” God implies that the his plan for the world, is essentially manifest and known, and that Job is to be blamed for obscuring it, for obscuring a truth that he is really aware of.[1]

All that God describes in chapters 38–41 are wonders, and in pointing to them, God is pointing to the infinity of his own wisdom and to the limitation of Job’s. But the limitation of Job’s wisdom is not the main point. The main point is something that man can see quite clearly if he only broadens his perspective: God’s wisdom and power in creating and ruling the cosmos. And this rule includes justice in the human sphere.[2]



[1] Crossan, J. D. (Ed.). (1981). The Book of Job and Ricoeur’s Hermeneutics. Semeia, 19, 59–60.

[2] Crossan, J. D. (Ed.). (1981). The Book of Job and Ricoeur’s Hermeneutics. Semeia, 19, 60.

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